ICanGarden Suggestions:

Looking for advice


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Rachelle01-May-06 03:57 PM EST 3a   
cathaleen02-May-06 12:26 AM EST 3   
Bob02-May-06 07:25 AM EST 5a   
Rachelle03-May-06 08:56 AM EST 3a   
keeping hanging pots from dryingout in summer heat05-May-06 05:03 PM EST 3a   
Lee06-May-06 01:43 PM EST 3b   
Valerie08-May-06 10:23 PM EST 2b   
Wendy14-May-06 04:27 PM EST 5a   
Linda16-May-06 03:18 PM EST 3   
Verena17-May-06 12:50 PM EST 3a   
18-May-06 05:23 PM EST 6b   
Anne18-May-06 05:24 PM EST   
Barbara23-May-06 11:57 AM EST 6a   
Michelle. L.25-May-06 01:13 AM EST 5b   
Monica01-Jun-06 01:04 PM EST 7a   
Patricia01-Jun-06 08:17 PM EST 5   
jeanette04-Jun-06 06:35 PM EST 4   
LORRAINE06-Jun-06 11:57 AM EST 5   
Annemarie Greven13-Jul-06 08:32 AM EST 4b   
Verena13-Jul-06 12:57 PM EST 3   
jude14-Jul-06 01:22 AM EST 8a   
Shari14-Jul-06 12:15 PM EST 6   
Michelle. L.15-Jul-06 03:23 AM EST 5b   
Michelle. L.15-Jul-06 03:23 AM EST 5b   
David; dawinter@mts.net16-Jul-06 05:57 PM EST 3a   
Michelle. L.17-Jul-06 04:20 AM EST 5b   
Shari18-Jul-06 11:41 AM EST 6   
Suzanne19-Jul-06 11:31 AM EST 4b   
Michelle. L.21-Jul-06 03:06 AM EST 5a   
Michelle. L.21-Jul-06 03:10 AM EST 5a   
Suzanne22-Jul-06 03:20 PM EST 4b   
Michelle. L.23-Jul-06 12:56 AM EST 5a   
Eleanor P24-Jul-06 11:10 PM EST 4b   
Shari25-Jul-06 12:17 PM EST 6   
debbie p19-Aug-07 07:56 PM EST 5a   
karen turner13-Oct-07 03:49 PM EST 2   
Tom Brown30-Dec-07 01:02 PM EST
Hanne Lene06-Apr-08 02:18 PM EST 6b   
Bob 23-Apr-08 02:01 PM EST 6a   
Anna25-Apr-08 07:31 PM EST 6a   
Michele25-Apr-08 11:37 PM EST 3a   
Madeline22-Jun-08 01:43 PM EST   
Ferne, Kamloops, B.C.23-Jun-08 01:53 AM EST 5b   
Colleen03-Jul-08 10:39 AM EST 5a   
Michelle10-Jul-08 12:30 AM EST 5a   
Jim12-Jul-08 11:31 PM EST 2   
karen25-Jul-08 07:34 PM EST 2   
ursula flesher30-Aug-08 11:22 AM EST 5   
bruce31-Aug-08 01:00 PM EST 4   
karen t.05-Sep-08 03:13 PM EST 2   
Margo31-Aug-10 05:07 PM EST 5   
masho19-May-11 09:00 AM EST 5b   


Subject: Looking for advice
From: Rachelle
Zone: 3a
Date: 01-May-06 03:57 PM EST

Hello,

This is my very first post. I have never done any gardening in my life but I have caught the gardening bug!I would like to plant a veggie garden (16x21)and a few flower beds around my house (in shady and partially sunny areas). I live in Kenora, ON (zone 3a).

I live out in the country and have a giant yard. I have a few worries...I'm afraid that deer and other critters might snack on my plants, I'm on a tight budget and I have a limited amount of time to spend in the garden because I have a small baby.

I am looking for advice as to what types of plants & veggies grow well in my area and which plants prefer the sun/shade. I am also interested in which plants have a reputation for being hardy. I would like suggestions regarding a type of fencing to go around my veggie garden and also cost effective ways to landscape my yard and create my gardens. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I'm really excited to begin my projects! My husband and I do a lot of entertaining during the summer months and I would really like to spruce things up. I can be reached through e-mail at cyconsultant@hotmail.com.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: cathaleen
Zone: 3
Date: 02-May-06 12:26 AM EST

Rachelle,

As someone who lives in zone 3 - I have slowly put together my back yard by trial and error. I have plants included that are zone 4 and the odd zone 5 plant, but advise you to stick with your plants zoned for your area when starting out - for plant wisely while learning and also so you don't lose a lot of money on plants that don't survive the winter.

For shady perennial beds, hosta, astilbe, bleeding hearts, perennial geraniums, goats beard, etc all do well - I would see if there is a local garden club - having plant sales and also talk to anyone you know with garden knowledge for your area - will save you heartache. Is there a good small local nursery - we are lucky enough to have a small nursery that grows hardy plants - ones that survive our climate with no winter protection - and are really reasonably priced.

I find so many plants do well in the sun perennial salvia, rudebeckia, globe thistle ( a personal favourite) , clematis ( esp polish spirit), fleabane, diantus, heliospsis, explorer roses etc .

My early books were Lois Holes books on perennials and annuals ( chekc out the library for a good source of books ). I don't know anything about deer and plants to plant and to avoid - but lots of magazines/books have lists.

I started with perennials supplemented by annuals until my perennial beds filled in - and now use very few annuals in the ground - only for planters and hanging baskets.....but once you are bitten by the gardening bug - it really gets you!!!! Good luck, plant what you like in the colours you like - but give your garden time to develope- every year a little bit more and sooner then you can believe it you'll be hunting for lawn!!

We drove across Canada 2 summers ago - and LOVED Kenora - it is so beautiful. Have a good summer


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Bob
Zone: 5a
Date: 02-May-06 07:25 AM EST

I used to live in Thunder Bay so have some familiarity with the region. Deer will devour most vegetables. It is like settign out a buffet for them so a good fence is a must. As to what is best, well first what is your budget. The fence needs to be at least 8 feet high. Deer can jump.

Most veggies need full sun, although lettuces and other salad greens appreciate some shade.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Rachelle
Zone: 3a
Date: 03-May-06 08:56 AM EST

Thanks for all of your advice! I have another question. Can you suggest a good kind of fertilizer for my veggie garden?


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: keeping hanging pots from dryingout in summer heat
Zone: 3a
Date: 05-May-06 05:03 PM EST

It gets so hot here and I am at the cottage all summer so my hanging outdoor plants dry out fast in summers heat . Any suggestions to help keep pots moist longer. thanks


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Lee
Zone: 3b
Date: 06-May-06 01:43 PM EST

Help! I have been battling red ants throughout my flowerbeds the last two years. Any suggestions? They have even moved into my pots now. I can't seem to get ahead of them, I have tried ever natural approach possible, from pouring boiling water into their hills to mixing borax with icing sugar, nothing has slowed them down. They have now created their own aphid farm on my snowball bush!


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Valerie
Zone: 2b
Date: 08-May-06 10:23 PM EST

Hi Rachelle. Here are some "deer proof" plants that you might be intrested in: Aster;Beardtongue;Beebalm;Bishop's Hat; Blamketflower; Bleeding Heart; Catmint; Daylily; Foxglove; Lamium; Lupin; Meadowsweet; Monkshood; Sage; Shasta Daisy; Snow-in-summer; Spurge and Yarrow.(all taken from Lois Hole's Perennial Favourites page 341


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Wendy
Zone: 5a
Date: 14-May-06 04:27 PM EST

I had great luck using fish emulsion for my plants. The growth and colour very showy. This is a great fertilizer.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Linda
Zone: 3
Date: 16-May-06 03:18 PM EST

I would like to plant a row of barberry shrubs in a cirle making a large circle around my fire pit. I would like to choose a shrub that has some interesting colour to it and will make a nice sort of hedge.

Can anyone recommend a specific kind of barberry that has interesting flowers/foliage that is also hardy for the Sherwood Park, Alberta area?

thanks very much.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Verena
Zone: 3a
Date: 17-May-06 12:50 PM EST

Rachelle: Welcome to the addictive world of gardening!! I also have a little one, so understand the time and $$ issues! If this is your first year, start small!! If you over do it, you may wind up not enjoying it.

For the deer, if fencing isn't an option, try a little predator scent. (Most hunting stores sell immitation urine, and I've heard that it acts as a deterent (a dog that has free range of your property and is outside at night would also likely work, if you're interested in a pet... :-) For fertilizer, if you haven't already, start composting. Well decomposed manure also works well (though it can carry seeds/weeds with it) and yes, if you know some one with fish, the water from the tank works well. (I have one friend who does a lot of fishing, and he actually burry's the entire fish carcass, (after he takes the meat) deep under every new plant he adds...you can tell when the roots make it to the fish, because they take right off. I DON'T suggest this though if you have racoons in your area, because they'll rip out all your plants to get the fish.

Hanging Pots: Many crafting supply stores sell those crystals that you soak with water and they swell into little blobs of gell (often used instead of water for floating candles). If you soak these and mix them through out your potting mix before planting your containers, it should extend the time between watering by a couple days. When you do water, make sure you soak well, so that the crystals can re-hydrate.(Got this tip off an episode of 'Get up & Grow')


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From:
Zone: 6b
Date: 18-May-06 05:23 PM EST

I planted a very tall eucolyptus tree. Lots of new growth still after pruning down about 2 or 3 feet.

Leaves near bottom 1/2 of tree are brown and dry. Possibly too windy but can't easily dig up now.

What is cause?


Subject: eucolyptus tree
From: Anne
Zone:
Date: 18-May-06 05:24 PM EST


Subject: RE: yellow clematis
From: Barbara
Zone: 6a
Date: 23-May-06 11:57 AM EST

Can antone tell me why the foliage on our 5 year old clematis is yellow this year? There are lots of buds and the plant looks healthy other than these bright yellow leaves. My others are green as usual. Am going to give it a dose of 20/20/20 and see if that helps.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5b
Date: 25-May-06 01:13 AM EST

To keep your containers that dry out so fast why not use a potting soil that keeps it moist longer? I forget what the name is that they have in it but Miracle Gro sells it and is GREAT!!!


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Monica (mandb_taylor@hotmail.com)
Zone: 7a
Date: 01-Jun-06 01:04 PM EST

I have several different clematis plants growing in my back yard. The plants are doing great. Growing like crazy. Trouble is they are not blooming. This is the third summer now with only a couple of flowers or not any at all. Right now I have one flower on one plant which I think is a Lincoln Star since it has 9 petals, is dark mauve or purple with a dark center. I also have a Vyvian Pennell (double flower) which blooms well every year. But then I have two other vines with no flowers at all. They are all in the same area. Along a garage south facing wall with partial sun and I have all the roots shaded from the sun with Hostas and Heather. I have asked my local nursery about this problem and they recommended bone meal. So last fall and this spring I have put lots of bone meal around the roots but no change. Any suggestions? Thank you.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Patricia (iris1@rogers.com)
Zone: 5
Date: 01-Jun-06 08:17 PM EST

This particular "thread" of messages has no rhyme or reason. If you want to ask a different question, you should start a new "thread", not just keep posting more messages that don't relate to the first message at all. This is a reply for the person who has problems with drying hanging baskets: if you are going to be away for a few days, take your basket down and sit it on the ground. See if you can place a saucer under the basket - to collect any rain. Put some mulch on top of the soil. Water deeply before you leave. When first planting your baskets, purchase soil that contains those little "moisture beads" - they make a big difference.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: jeanette
Zone: 4
Date: 04-Jun-06 06:35 PM EST

I have 2 four year old witchita blue juniper spiral tree. This year they are turning brown, inside the tree and on the bottom. The tips are also turning brown. My question is what can i do to save it or if i can. I water it every week and feed it twice a month. thank-you jeanette


Subject: planting bleeding hearts
From: LORRAINE (lormikwrig@lks.net)
Zone: 5
Date: 06-Jun-06 11:57 AM EST

I just purchased four bleeding heart bulbs (if that's what they are) and didn't receive any instructions on planting them..I have never had them before and am not sure which end is the end to plant :-( Do the brownish stalks stay above ground or the reverse? Desperate for help. thanks!


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Annemarie Greven (annegreven@sympatico.ca)
Zone: 4b
Date: 13-Jul-06 08:32 AM EST

Good morning I am not quiet sure about the zone around Montreal. I have a pinc Oleander 5 feet tall. During the winter I keep it in the house and it is doing well. This year I kept it a little longer in the house because of the cooler weather, but now outside in the sun it is loosing its leaves, they are drying up. What am I doing wrong. Please help I hate to lose it. Thank you Annemarie


Subject: Possible answers
From: Verena
Zone: 3
Date: 13-Jul-06 12:57 PM EST

OK, lots of questions on here...but not many answers, so I'll try to help.

Anne, sorry, I know nothing of the eucolyptus...they don't grow here, and I've never tried one.

Barbara - How's your Clematis doing with the 20-20-20? If that hasn't helped, my mom says that yellowing like that can be caused by an iron deficiency in the soil (she has a couple of plants doing that this year.) You may want to try that, but talk to your local green house to find out proportions etc.

Monica - How experienced are you with clematis? I'm fairly new to them, but some varieties only flower on old wood, and some only on new. If you aren't pruneing them back and they need it, or you are and they don't, that could be the cause. (I have two varieties that have to be pruned almost to the ground in the early spring.)

Jeanette - sorry, no experience with that one, hopefully someone else will answer it for you.

Lorraine - bleading hearts are actually a root, not a bulb, (not that it really matters :-) ...the brownish stalks should face up...however, if you're just buying them now, and they're brown (possibly gotten from someplace like w-mart??) they may have already sprouted and died back from lack of water. You may want to take them back if that is the case. If you can't take them back, plant them and water them well this year (and remember where you put them) they may just come back next year. (I bought a bare root hosta for $1 last year that had sprouted and then died right back to nothing...I saw no sign of it all last year and this year it showed up, a little stunted, but taking off. I that doesn't work, try to find people having garage sales, with big healthy ones and ask them if they'd be willing to sell you a shovel full. Bleading hearts tend to like the abuse and established plants take off when they get divided.

Annemarie - You should be zone 4, I did a little search on Oleander and they seem to be a zone 8 plant Don't know a lot about them, but here's a guess...anyone feel free to correct me if you think it's something else...Did you harden it off or just put it out?? If it was used to the stability of temperaturs in the house, the shock of suddenly going into hot days and cool nights, that could be setting it back. Also please remember that they are highly toxic, including the dried up dead leaves...some sources say that as little as one leaf can kill a child, so please be careful about clean up. (And don't use dead leaves in compost for your veggie garden!!)

Good luck, all! Happy Gardening!

Verena


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: jude
Zone: 8a
Date: 14-Jul-06 01:22 AM EST

I am not sure if this is being posted on the right place...sorry if it is wrong....

I have a plant which is about 2 metres high, delicate palest pink and hint of lavender, lovely scent. The local garden centre after a lot of discussion calls it a campanula lactifolia. None of the sites I have looked at mention scent and they all put it at half the height. (Although I did put fish compost on my garden this year with amazing reults...)The blooms look very similar and the bushy plant is stunningly beautiful. Does Campanula have a scent? Does it come in diferent colours?


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Shari (sharishabits@telus.net)
Zone: 6
Date: 14-Jul-06 12:15 PM EST

First of all, I second Patricia's comment - if you have a new question, please start a new thread, this thread is getting way too big and going all over the place.

I would like to respond first to Rachelle, wanting to start a veggie garden in Kenora ON. I highly recommend the Square Foot Gardening method developed by Mel Bartholomew. He was frustrated by the problems of traditional row gardening and developed this method in response. In a nutshell, you create 4'x4' blocks, divided into 1'x1' squares, for your veggie garden instead of a great big garden planted in rows. In general you plant a different crop in each square, and you plant the seeds/bedding plants as far apart as the mature plants should be. You plant only as much as you need/want/want to be harvesting at one time and when one crop is done, you take it out and plant something else. This method combines the principles of succession planting and companion planting, eliminates thinning (a real time-waster), and reduces the need for watering and weeding. You also avoid having enormous amounts of one crop all needing to be harvested & dealt with all at once. I am having a lot of success with this method and I wouldn't go back to rows. I am also using raised beds (Mel Bartholomew is also advocating this as it prevents the soil from becoming compacted) and highly recommend them. But definitely go to the source for SFG - check out Mel's website and his book, both with the Square Foot Gardening title. He's a wealth of information, everything a beginning veggie gardener needs to know!

For your perennial flower bed I also recommend daylilies for your sunnier beds - they are easy-care, tolerate a wide variety of growing conditions, and they put out profuse beautiful blooms. You can get them in a variety of sizes & colours.

Now to the lady who asked about keeping hanging baskets moist - the product you are looking for is called Soil Moist - those are the water-absorbent crystals you can mix into your potting mix. I'm using them & they help a lot.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5b
Date: 15-Jul-06 03:23 AM EST

Hi Jude.. you are lucky to have that plant.. I know EXACTLY what one you have.. I had to go myself to Vancouver [ I live in the Okanogan] to buy it as I couldn't find it here and it was not sold in any of my seed catalogues anymore this year.. and I have searched the nurseries here for 3 years!!! But I have it now and yes it smells WONDERFUL!!! As far as I know [ and I have many Campanulas] it is the only one that smells. It is a Campanula Lactiflora called "Loddon Anna". I thought maybe all the kinds of the C. Lactiflora might have that great smell but nope.. this is the only one. It is such a great plant in many ways that once I found it I purchased two. I also found it strange that any books or even the tag on the two I purchased doesn't mention the scent but isn't a great bonus??


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5b
Date: 15-Jul-06 03:23 AM EST

Hi Jude.. you are lucky to have that plant.. I know EXACTLY what one you have.. I had to go myself to Vancouver [ I live in the Okanogan] to buy it as I couldn't find it here and it was not sold in any of my seed catalogues anymore this year.. and I have searched the nurseries here for 3 years!!! But I have it now and yes it smells WONDERFUL!!! As far as I know [ and I have many Campanulas] it is the only one that smells. It is a Campanula Lactiflora called "Loddon Anna". I thought maybe all the kinds of the C. Lactiflora might have that great smell but nope.. this is the only one. It is such a great plant in many ways that once I found it I purchased two.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: David; dawinter@mts.net
Zone: 3a
Date: 16-Jul-06 05:57 PM EST

I have heard Epsom Salt recommended for tomatoes and for roses. I have the Salt now, but no advice in terms of dosages and how applied. Would appreciate help!


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5b
Date: 17-Jul-06 04:20 AM EST

Hi David, the recommended dose for roses is 1 tablespoon applied about 2 inches from the base of the rose, and for tomatoes it is 1 teaspoon. I use it for my clematis as well..


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Shari (sharishabits@telus.net)
Zone: 6
Date: 18-Jul-06 11:41 AM EST

What does epsom salt do?


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Suzanne
Zone: 4b
Date: 19-Jul-06 11:31 AM EST

Hi: My question is about 2 Monarda (On Parade and Coral Reef) which are not producing proper flowers. The buds look fine but when they open there are no flowers just an empty bud. This is the same on both plants. Otherwise both plants appear to be healthy. They are planted in different parts of my garden. While doing a tour of my garden this morning with a neighbour he suggested that perhaps the plants have a virus. Both of these plants came from the same wholesaler. Also have a question about iris borer. How does this spread, how can it be prevented and what should be done when it's discovered.

Thanks, Suzanne.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5a
Date: 21-Jul-06 03:06 AM EST

How old are your plants Suzanne? This is just a guess but if they are a few years old, maybe that is why they aren't flowering.. Monarda is supposed to be divided every couple of years and just replant the outside younger growth and get rid of the older inner growth.. anyways this is what I have heard/ read is recommended and I don't know if you don't do this the result being less/ no flowering???


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5a
Date: 21-Jul-06 03:10 AM EST

Hi there everyone!! Hopefully this is the last post here.. it is too long to scroll down now. Please start a new thread!!!! I and i am sure others will thank you!! LOL Happy gardening!! P.S. Can you believe it is getting to the end of July soon already?? Too fast for my liking, enjoy your gardens while we still have them this year


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Suzanne
Zone: 4b
Date: 22-Jul-06 03:20 PM EST

Thanks Michelle L.

One monarda was planted 3 years ago and bloomed for the first time last year and the second one went in the garden last year and bloomed (or not) for the first time this year. But thanks for the suggestion - they are living on borrowed time as no point having perennials that don't bloom even though the fragrance is quite lovely from the leaves.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5a
Date: 23-Jul-06 12:56 AM EST

give it a try Suzanne, i can't think of any other reason.. maybe the people on live chat on this site would know.. they are online tomorrow [sunday] at 10 or 1 eastern.. i take it with you being in zone 4b you don't live by me, too bad i could give you lots!! Good Luck!! Just thought i would also mention that after searching for a year for a white monarda i finally found one and although small this year they grow so fast and am looking forward to seeing it next year, for a long time I didn't even know about a white one. I just thought of something.. is your monarda in full sun?? if it is then this is a puzzle.. even my new one this year is blooming.. they like full sun.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Eleanor P (punch@look.ca)
Zone: 4b
Date: 24-Jul-06 11:10 PM EST

My garden has a weed that I believe is called Black Medic. It looks something like a small clover and bears yellow flowers. Can anyone tell me how to rid my garden of this pest.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Shari (sharishabits@telus.net)
Zone: 6
Date: 25-Jul-06 12:17 PM EST

Hi Eleanor I have started a new thread, "weed control", to answer this question as this thread has become very long and wandering. I also felt that the topic of weeds was a good one for a new thread. So please look there for a reply.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice on drought/heat
From: debbie p
Zone: 5a
Date: 19-Aug-07 07:56 PM EST

Hi folks, I'm in Toronto and my garden is mostly perennials, shrubs and veggies. Garden is like a dust bowl this year. Everything from the black-eyed susans, coneflowers, joe pye and plume poppies are brown crunchy and dying. My fall asters started blooming in July. I have a large corner lot so to water takes almost all day and by the next day there's no sign that I've watered. I have 4-6 iches of mulch on beds where there is no ground cover. My question is should I just start cutting stuff down now. I cut down my day lillies(a four foot bed full)a month ago and I have lots of new shoots. Rain is not forcast for a while and even though temp. is cooling off a night I think I would need a solid week of rain to help. Any suggestion on helping the garden get through this would be appreciated. Thank you


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: karen turner (kariltur@hotmail.com)
Zone: 2
Date: 13-Oct-07 03:49 PM EST

How do I get rid of the pidgeon invasion on my balcony as it is very dirty and maggots are in the saucers under the pots of shrubs, etc? I put some mice seed laced with some kind of poison in the saucers. Will this do the trick. I sure hope so as my throwing arm is not to good. Anyone have an answer.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Tom Brown
Date: 30-Dec-07 01:02 PM EST

I had 5 healthy Brandon Cedars in the fall and recently the deer got at them and ate all of the leaves. Will they grow greenery again? What should I do to assist in rapid regrowth if at all possible?


Subject: RE: Looking for advice -pruning dwarf gravenstein
From: Hanne Lene (dalgers@gmail.com)
Zone: 6b
Date: 06-Apr-08 02:18 PM EST

i have a dwarf gravenstein apple tree that i got about two years ago, but i haven't pruned it. the trunk has two main branches and those two branches have many small branch shoots. on the trunk, there are also two small branch shoots under the two main branches. they are about an inch long. also, if there is any general advice in keeping the tree healthy, that would be super. i have it in a container, about 18" high and 15" in diameter.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Bob
Zone: 6a
Date: 23-Apr-08 02:01 PM EST

When i first dug my perennial garden, my neighbours trees weren't a problem. Now, after 20 years, there is a maple in particular that shades my south-west garden allowing only 4 hours of direct sun in the afternoon from 1-5PM EDT. It has become more and more difficult, especially roses which succumbed this year, however, daylilies and phlox still seem to get enought light to grow (albeit maybe not to their fullest capabilities). I was contemplating replacing my roses with Monarda Blue Stocking, Croftway Pink, Raspberry Wine...). I should mention that the garden is on the side of the house and receives reflection from the brick. Do you think they will be OK?


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Anna
Zone: 6a
Date: 25-Apr-08 07:31 PM EST

My first post! I'm trying to help out some friends who recently bought a house in the city with a large back yard that has been neglected for years. The entire space is covered with weeds. There is no grass or beds. I don't remember everything that's in there except for the huge burdock plants among the 'collection'. Last year they attempted to remove the weeds by hand but I think it resulted in many seeds falling to the ground and lots of roots being left. This spring the new crop is on it's way up. Does anyone have any advice for how to get this problem under control? Drastic measures are welcome. Thanks!


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Michele
Zone: 3a
Date: 25-Apr-08 11:37 PM EST

By "drastic measures", I hope they don't include using toxic chemicals to expunge the weeds. The best organic method is to pull the roots by hand. Gently using a garden fork, work up the soil a few feet at a time, and pull the weeds and roots before the weeds turn to seed. I had to do this with an 800 square foot plot, and have had very few weeks come back. Lots of mulch helps keeps the weeds at bay once the garden has been planted out again. It's hard work, but worth it, especially without the chemicals.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Madeline
Zone:
Date: 22-Jun-08 01:43 PM EST

Now that my lovely iris have finished blooming, what do I do with the 'spent' blooms? Do I cut them off or let them die even more? I'm in the Kithener zone.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice-To Madine with the Iris.
From: Ferne, Kamloops, B.C.
Zone: 5b
Date: 23-Jun-08 01:53 AM EST

You will find that it is easy to just snap of the heads as they finish blooming (looks nicer). When the blooming stems are completely finished you can cut them of at the base with a knife.

If the plants need dividing, as a lot of Iris do every few years, once they get going, you can do that in August or September. At that time you can cut the leafs back to a few inches to make dividing easier. A sharp knife or shovel is good for dividing the rhizomes into smaller pieces. New pieces might take two or three years to bloom again, so if you have more than one clump you might want to spread that job out over more than one year. Placement needs to be in full sun, with the "neck" of your new plant sticking out of the ground. The common type of Iris should not have those rhizomes buried. They should be nearly on the surface...cover them completely and they could rot. With Iris you generally end up with more than you want, so donate extra pieces to neighbours, garden club events, etc.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Colleen
Zone: 5a
Date: 03-Jul-08 10:39 AM EST

Hi everyone. I am in some serious need for some help regarding Rose Chafers. This is my first experience with them and they are destroying my Roses as well as my Holly Hocks, Hydrangeas, Grape Vine, and my Hops Vine. Can anyone help me with ideas on how to get rid of these bugs and their larvae????


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Michelle
Zone: 5a
Date: 10-Jul-08 12:30 AM EST

ENOUGH ALREADY ON THIS ONE... EVERYONE PLEASE START A NEW THREAD!!! THANK YOU


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Jim
Zone: 2
Date: 12-Jul-08 11:31 PM EST

Hello everyone Can anyone tell me if there is a "vine-like" perennial that will grow in a very shady area?


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: karen (kariltur@hotmail.com)
Zone: 2
Date: 25-Jul-08 07:34 PM EST

Last yr. I had trouble with gophers digging tunnels in my raised beds. Guess what they are back as of last Saturday! Last year I took a pitch fork and stabbed into their tunnels and lairs numerous times. I then filled in the entrance holes. THey got hurt pretty bad I guess because they left and moved on.

I heard also that pidgeons don't like water sprayed on them when they landed on balconies. I have been thinking of buying a large water gun to blast them with. The city just finished sanitizing our balcony with bleach and water and removed the poo from the walls of the railings. What do you think?


Subject: Looking for advice
From: ursula flesher
Zone: 5
Date: 30-Aug-08 11:22 AM EST

I am still looking for help with my mountain ash. Shortly after the leaves come out in spring they get a yellow rim around the edge. Slowly over summer they sort of curl and start to go brown. this has happened at least 3 yr now. It has berries each yr but is not really growing. any ideas? I've tried spraying but no diff.


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: bruce (gyrobruce@gmail.com)
Zone: 4
Date: 31-Aug-08 01:00 PM EST

tomatoes.... It.s virtually September, and both myself and my mother have tomato plants in pots, with lots of fruit developing, and none ripening. We want to let plants do their thing as long as possible before picking (I do have a great Green Tomato Mincemeat recipe, but that's not why we are growing) My Q: are there things we can do to inspire some ripening on the vine???


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: karen t. (kariltur@hotmail.com)
Zone: 2
Date: 05-Sep-08 03:13 PM EST

Anyone out there who knows what grows well in containers on a balcony with east exposure? This is for vegetables! I am probably giving up my two community plots next year because of the raiding and vandalism. Thanks!


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: Margo
Zone: 5
Date: 31-Aug-10 05:07 PM EST

I have grown roses for a number of years now. Last year I had to move the roses due to renovations. They were moved just before blooming to partly shaded area and covered with soil. After the renos they were moved back into full sun at the hottest time of last summer. They did not flower last year after the move and seemed to winter over well. This summer they have not flowered and have grown long and leggy. I have cut them back a bit during the late spring and summer hoping for something to happen. They just keep growing long and leggy. I have never had this happen before and wonder if they were too shocked from the moves, winter etc. and have reverted back to the original root stock and will not flower now. Any ideas out there???????


Subject: RE: Looking for advice
From: masho
Zone: 5b
Date: 19-May-11 09:00 AM EST

hi,

I live in a farely new house and we recently had our fence up only on 2 sides. My house is backing a ravine which is divided by a chain link fence. Our back yard is facing east and front lawn is facing west. During the summer and spring we have sun till about 2 pm in the back yard, considering that I have to decide on what kind of shrubs and flowers I should plant. Can anyone help me with a Garden Design and choosing less maintenance plants with just few annuals so I could change each year?

P.S. i am totally new to gardening and it is my first time attempting it.

Thanks.


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