Soil & Compost:

new to gardening HELP needed


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Chris25-Jul-03 02:29 AM EST 5b   
Susan25-Jul-03 08:53 AM EST 6a   
Wendy P22-Feb-04 02:01 PM EST 7   
Doris18-May-05 09:59 PM EST 2b   
Doris18-May-05 09:59 PM EST 2b   
Doris18-May-05 10:00 PM EST 2b   
Marnie26-May-05 02:10 PM EST 5b   
Christina06-Jul-05 03:37 PM EST 5   
sandy25-Jan-06 08:45 AM EST 6a   
Patricia 25-Jan-06 02:15 PM EST 5a   
Gardening Gal31-Jan-06 09:47 AM EST 5   
Valerie16-Apr-06 08:04 AM EST 3   
18-Apr-06 06:08 AM EST 5b   
Dinene15-May-06 12:34 PM EST 2   
Ginger-zone 5b20-May-06 01:41 PM EST   
Michelle. L.21-May-06 01:24 AM EST   
Sunflowers01-Jun-06 08:27 PM EST 5   
Nancy 15-Jun-06 10:40 PM EST 7   
GT08-Jul-06 05:25 PM EST 2b   
Pearl Frushour28-Sep-06 09:21 PM EST 6b   
Brenda 09-Oct-06 05:15 PM EST 3a   
Michelle. L.10-Oct-06 02:14 PM EST 5a   
Verena13-Oct-06 10:59 PM EST 3a   
Michelle. L.14-Oct-06 02:35 AM EST 5a   
Shari14-Oct-06 12:35 PM EST 6   
Michelle. L.16-Oct-06 12:14 AM EST 6   
karen turner15-Nov-06 02:36 PM EST 2a   
Michelle. L.17-Nov-06 12:23 PM EST 5a   
karen turner22-Nov-06 02:15 PM EST 2a   
Michelle. L.24-Nov-06 02:37 AM EST 5a   
Heli21-Feb-07 10:03 PM EST 3a   
Maryann08-Mar-07 11:34 PM EST 3   
n.stites09-Apr-07 10:19 AM EST 9   
Maureen05-Jul-07 06:29 PM EST   
Maureen05-Jul-07 06:31 PM EST   
Rita23-Jun-09 09:23 PM EST 5b   


Subject: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Chris
Zone: 5b
Date: 25-Jul-03 02:29 AM EST

Hi, I am a first time gardener, just this May I moved into a house with a garden. By June I had my garden growing. Did not want to overwhelm myself, but seems i have. In row 1 I have: 2 Green Bell Peppers; 2 Tomatoe Plants (with round wire cage thingy); 2 Garden Cucumbers, and 2 Zucchini's In row 2 I have: 1 Celery; 4 Brocolli, and 2 English Cucumbers In row 3 I have: 2 Green Cabbage; 1 Red Cabbage; 1 Kale and a ton of Leaf Lettuce Last row is Strawberries, Squash, Canteloupe and Beets. At the back I "dropped" the pack of seeds the length of the garden. Now for my questions. 1)Do I need to wrap my Cabbage or will it close on its own? 2)Do I need to get those wire thingys for the Peppers and cuc's? 3)Something is eating my Brocolli leaves... but I dont see anything on them.... 4)The Beets are the only thing I started from seed, how do I know when they are ready?? 5)The carrots are starting to show their tops.... and their are LOTS of them, do I need to weed them out or will they do that themselves?? 6)I have been putting the sprinkler on it every morning at about 7am for a couple of hours and again in the evening for a couple of hours.... is this wrong? 7) The whole garden gets full sun all day. I heard recently that tomoatoes should only have morning sun.... what do I do to get the best tomatoes i can? PLEASE PLEASE HELP ME


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Susan
Zone: 6a
Date: 25-Jul-03 08:53 AM EST

1. Cabbages form the heads without you doing anything to them. The lower leaves stay spread out wide but the head will form in the center.

2. Peppers don't need the cage things in most cases. Usually the plant is sturdy enough to stand upright and bear the weight of the peppers. Cucumbers usally spread along the ground. Some people train them up trellises to save space and/or keep the cucumbers off the ground. If you leave them on the ground (which is what I used to do - I have no veggie garden at my current house as I have mostly shade and very little sun...), they take up LOTS of room so I hope you've got wide rows!

3. Broccoli (and cabbages) usually get badly eaten on the leaves. There are various things that munch on them. I'm not a big fan of either crop so, hopefully someone else can give you information on what to do about the leaf eaters...

4&5. You should be able to see the beets forming at the base of the leaves, just at or below ground. Harvest when they look like the size you want them to be. Beets, like carrots, need to be thinned out as seedlings or they will get too crowded. Thin the carrots to leave at least 1-1.5" between plants to allow the carrots to form properly. Beets need a little more space between the plants.

6. It is generally not a good idea to leave foliage wet overnight (encourages molds and fungus...) so it is better to water early in the morning. The ideal way to water is using a soaker hose on the ground at the base of the plants. They get watered thoroughly and deeply without getting the foliage wet at all. Try that next year. It works great in a veggie patch where you can run hoses down each row (...also works great in flower beds...)

7. Full sun is fine for tomatoes. If the tomatoes have wilt diseases, hot afternoon sun will be hard on them but your best solution really is to make sure you buy varieties that are fusarium and verticillium wilt resistant.

Good luck with your garden. If you're in Ontario, our unusally cool, wet spring/summer this year may have put things a bit behind schedule, especially for heat loving crops like tomatoes and peppers...


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Wendy P
Zone: 7
Date: 22-Feb-04 02:01 PM EST

Hope you had a good bounty from you veggy patch and are willing to go at it again this year. Applying a layer of compost or well-rotted manure [except where potatoes go] is a great way to start. Do it as early as possible and then till it in closer to planting time.

You must also plan where your babies are going to spend their summer. Crop rotation involves changing the growing area of plants year to year. This is especially important for tomatoes as blight is a soil-bourne disease.

Pick your varieties carefully. Your local garden center will have ones suited to your climate and popular in your area. 'Brandywine' is a heritage variety that is still going strong. 'Early Girl', 'Celebrity', 'Better Boy', 'Fantastic', 'La Roma', 'Tumbler' and 'Sweet Million' are popular here on the Coast.

In their new position, plant your tomato seedlings [when it gets warm enough] deeply, up to their top set of leaves - new roots will form along the buried stem. Decide on you support method and put it in place. Rolled up stucco wire makes an excellent tall tomato cage. Next, mulch your plants well. This aids in moisture retention, cuts down on weeds and prevents the soil from splashing up onto the foliage.

Tomatoes are heavy feeders that need a even supply of water. Granular veggy food [6-8-6, etc] works well. About mid-summer, Brian Minter [my old boss] recommends a copper spray to prevent blight. If your plants succumb, there's not much that can be done. I've heard of some people pulling up their infested plants and hanging them upside-down to wait for the fruit to ripen. I'd probably be more inclined to mincemeat or fried green tomatoes. Best of Luck!!

PS - Use bt [bacillus thuringiensis] on your brassicas - cabbage and brocolli. The damage was probably caused by catepillars [which are the basis for every moth and butterfly]. This bacteria is only harmful to catepillars when they eat the leaves. Read all instructions and don't have a spray-for-all.


Subject: RE: new to starting indoor plants
From: Doris
Zone: 2b
Date: 18-May-05 09:59 PM EST

Started plants indoors in plastic greehouse. Sprayed with "damp off" when plants where small . Still getting some mildew on some re-sprayed containers.Is it to damp, to warm ? Should I worry about all the plants getting moldy. Should I maybe move greenhouse to garage to start hardning???


Subject: RE: new to starting indoor plants
From: Doris
Zone: 2b
Date: 18-May-05 09:59 PM EST

Started plants indoors in plastic greehouse. Sprayed with "damp off" when plants where small . Still getting some mildew on some re-sprayed containers.Is it to damp, to warm ? Should I worry about all the plants getting moldy. Should I maybe move greenhouse to garage to start hardning???


Subject: RE: new to starting indoor plants
From: Doris
Zone: 2b
Date: 18-May-05 10:00 PM EST

Started plants indoors in plastic greehouse. Sprayed with "damp off" when plants where small . Still getting some mildew on some re-sprayed containers.Is it to damp, to warm ? Should I worry about all the plants getting moldy. Should I maybe move greenhouse to garage to start hardning???


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Marnie
Zone: 5b
Date: 26-May-05 02:10 PM EST

Saved my geraniums in pots over the winter, but since I've planted them outdoors, all the leaves have turned a maroon red. Are they lacking some nutrient or just getting used to the outdoors?


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Christina
Zone: 5
Date: 06-Jul-05 03:37 PM EST

I am also having serious problems with my garden. I too am fairly new at this. I planted a few brocolli last year and had no problmes at all. this year, i succession planted so I could have brocolli for the whole summer. The older ones are doing fine. The newer ones are all dying. We had a horrible storm here on Sat. I am not sure if that is the start of it or what. Any suggestions? My potatoes are also falling over. They are about 3.5 feet tall. Does that mean they are ready>? Thank you for your help everyone!!! ( I'm glad you're here!)


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: sandy
Zone: 6a
Date: 25-Jan-06 08:45 AM EST

Iam trying to find a list of suggested annuals and perennials for my zone Anyone have a suggestion?


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Patricia (iris1@rogers.com)
Zone: 5a
Date: 25-Jan-06 02:15 PM EST

To Sandy: Knowing your zone is a good thing, but for suggestions for annuals and perennials, you need more information: like what kind of property do you have: shady, sunny, what kind of soil: clay, loam, sand, etc. etc. and also how much work you want to put into looking after these flowers? Also, do you want tall plants, flowers to cut for the house, etc. etc. My suggestion is that you visit a couple of good quality nurseries early in the growing season: choose some things that attract you and then ask questions of the staff there, tell them about your place and what effect you want to achieve. Make sense?


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Gardening Gal
Zone: 5
Date: 31-Jan-06 09:47 AM EST

Hi Sandy:

Try the local library to borrow some gardening books, and then buy only the ones you can't do without. I have a dog eared Lois Hole Perennial book that lives in my car so I can check plants while I'm out. As soon as the weather starts to improve check local papers for horticultural clubs, plant and garage sales, what people are selling in your area is generally what grows well and they're splitting good plants. Enjoy


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Valerie
Zone: 3
Date: 16-Apr-06 08:04 AM EST

Join a local Garden Club!!


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From:
Zone: 5b
Date: 18-Apr-06 06:08 AM EST


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Dinene
Zone: 2
Date: 15-May-06 12:34 PM EST

Reclaiming a garden Hi! I am new to gardening also and am trying to reclaim the garden spot from dandelions, dandelions,and more dandelions. So far, I have been digging up the dandelions....deep to the root and hauling them off to the garbage. Anyone have any suggestions. My garden will be rotortilled this weekend and planted. I live in a northernish climate...zone 2...Grande Prairie,AB. Question 2...slugs...ate my petunias last year. Any tips? I have been saving washed eggshells like crazy. Does this work? Thanks.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Ginger-zone 5b (gingerbarkley@yahoo.ca)
Zone:
Date: 20-May-06 01:41 PM EST

Is it okay to plant sunflowers all along a fence line?


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Michelle. L.
Zone:
Date: 21-May-06 01:24 AM EST

Yes, you can plant them along a fence line, actually depending on what variety you plant, that could be a real bonus to do so as some get tall and BIG , HEAVY heads on them that I find they start to lean so it comes in handy with the fence, so you could tie them to it for a little extra support. Go for it.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Sunflowers (iris1@rogers.com)
Zone: 5
Date: 01-Jun-06 08:27 PM EST

About sunflowers: remember that the flowers will face south: so think about where you want to plant them so that you will view the flower, not the back of it.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Nancy
Zone: 7
Date: 15-Jun-06 10:40 PM EST

Gardening magazines are wonderful!!! I'm addicted to them. They come out during all the seasons & have great ideas. Also, there are hundreds of gardening sites. One of my faves is bhg.com (Better Homes & Gardens).


Subject: RE: New shrubs
From: GT
Zone: 2b
Date: 08-Jul-06 05:25 PM EST

Planted 4 small bailey cranberry shrubs in May. One shrub is very sickly looking-almost all leaves turned brown-very twiggy-only few leaves left. Some of the leaves have turned brown on another shrub but is it much healthier looking. We have been watering -maybe too much? Should this shrub be replaced or will it come back?


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Pearl Frushour
Zone: 6b
Date: 28-Sep-06 09:21 PM EST

about potatoes. when they get 4 or 5 inches tall you put dirt to the tops of them - yes cover them nearly all the way. then when they get that tall again cover again. I can't remember how you know they are done as it has been awhile since I raised potatoes. for one thing you probably want some small ones in the season. so you just dig in the side of the hill (and by now it is a hill) and check to see how big they are. with sweet potatoes you have to dig them before frost because frost ruins the sweet potatoes. sweet ptotatoes are planted in a hill and you do not top them off but irish potatoes are planted in a ditch. I imagine this is late for this season but will help you next year.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Brenda
Zone: 3a
Date: 09-Oct-06 05:15 PM EST

Hello! I'm a novice gardener and need some help if you care to. I live near Edmonton, Alberta, and have most of my flowers in containers, with just one large perennial bed. I absolutely LOVE my flowers, and have a tough time parting with them in the fall. My question is: Can perennials that have been in pots, such as phlox, some grasses, pansies etc., be transplanted in the fall in to my perennial bed? I understand that some plants are only perennials in milder climates and confess to my confusion over this. One more thing, I have been told that rose bushes, including the tea rose, which are in pots can be watered profusely before a good freeze and will come alive again in spring as long as they are well frozen in. True? AND...is the best time to prune my lilac bushes spring? or fall? Thank you so much.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5a
Date: 10-Oct-06 02:14 PM EST

Hi Brenda, You can plant your perennials from your pots in the ground to winter over.. ones that are hardy for you anyhow, which means your zone or lower, definetly your phlox and pansies.. i don't know which grasses you have but if in your general zone then they should be fine too.. Roses need to be watered in for winter, yes, nothing like dry roots in winter to kill off a plant but in your zone I don't believe they should be in pots over winter.. tuck them in the ground. Lilacs should be pruned IMMEDIATELY after flowering, no later, or you won't get blooms next spring. Hope this helps you. By the way I am in zone 5a and even here some of my tea roses no matter how much protected die in the winter.. you will lose them in the pots, unless maybe the whole pot is sunk in the ground. Just thought I would mention it so you don't have to spend more $$$ in the spring to replace your hybrid teas.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Verena
Zone: 3a
Date: 13-Oct-06 10:59 PM EST

Hello Brenda, I'm just south of you near Red Deer. I second everything Michelle has said. As for tea roses...sorry, but good luck. :-( I know very few people who are successful with them in our zone (though there are one or two that I know of). If they are going to have any chance of surviving the winter, you will want to get them in the ground, water them well, wrap them in burlap to keep the tops from winter killing, and then put a deep mulch around them. Hopefully that will work. We can get some zone 4 plants to over winter here, with special care, but they aren't necessarily what you want to start out trying. Most tea roses I've seen are zone 5 or 6 and that's why they winter kill, also some of the ones you get here aren't "own root" roses, they have a graft of a tea or climbing rose, set into the hardier root stock of a (usually much less attractive) hardy variety of rose, something to watch for. If the rose winter kills to the graft, the plant that comes up in the spring will be from the root stock instead of the tea or climber that you planted. If yours doesn't survive, but you really want to grow roses, look for the "Hardy" roses (Ie: the ones named after explorers like "David Thompson", "Henry Hudson", "John Cabot" etc. or the ones with "Morden" in their names. Most don't have the clasic tea rose form, which is unfortunate, but you should have an easier time growing them, and though different, they are very pretty too. Also, I have yet to find a true "climbing" rose that thrives here, but some of the "explorer" roses, that say "explorer" on the back (as opposed to "bush") can be quite effective as a climber, though they usually take several years to get to that size. Good luck in any case, with some extra TLC, you may be able to keep your tea roses going. If you have any other questions about plants for our zone, feel free to e-mail me if you like, and I'll help you if I can.(Though everyone here is very friendly too :-)

Verena verenaprimeau@hotmail.com


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5a
Date: 14-Oct-06 02:35 AM EST

Hello again Brenda, I just read Verena's reply and I agree.. the Morden series and the Explorers are the roses you want to plant.. I just want to add that when you find them ask the nursery if they are own root roses or if they are grafted. You want the own root like Verena said. I used to be under the impression that all the Explorers came from their own roots but was surprised to find out that they are not!! For example, before they became more available in the nursery's, I had orderd some from Dominion Seed House, I cancelled my order after finding out they were grafted onto a Dr. Huey rootstock. I should add though that except for this, D.S.H. has been a great company to order from and stand behind their products. If you order from a catalogue, if it doesn't specify "own root" then ask!!! Even in my zone [5a] I am planting more of the hardy roses, the teas albeit beautiful, are sometimes not up to take our winters even though protected.. not just the cold but sometimes the freeze/thaw/freeze is too much for them... the explorer/morden varieties seem to be able to shrug off winter no problem. They are great!!! Morden Sunrise is a especially beautiful one if you like yellow/soft orange colors, in my garden right now it is still blooming profusely even though we have had very cold, and even one freezing night!!


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Shari (sharishabits@telus.net)
Zone: 6
Date: 14-Oct-06 12:35 PM EST

I also have a Morden Sunrise and agree with Michelle that it is a gorgeous rose - soft yellow with a pinkish sort of blush at the edges of the petals. Mine is still blooming too. It hasn't gone through a winter yet though.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 6
Date: 16-Oct-06 12:14 AM EST

Your Morden Sunrise will pull through winter no problem Shari.. my two are 3 years old, and I did not give them any protection either.. very little dieback.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: karen turner (kariltur@hotmail.com)
Zone: 2a
Date: 15-Nov-06 02:36 PM EST

I would like to have an armaryllis plant this winter in my apartment. It faces east. It is also on the lowest level with balcony overhanging it. Is this a good plant for my place? I just finished throwing out a lot of house plants.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5a
Date: 17-Nov-06 12:23 PM EST

As long as your amaryllis is getting some light it should be fine. One of mine is in what would be a fairly dark corner but I have a corner light above it and is growing fine. Just keep turning the pot so it doesn't keep bending one way.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: karen turner (kariltur@hotmail.com)
Zone: 2a
Date: 22-Nov-06 02:15 PM EST

michelle, thanks for the advice. What about grow lights? That is what i have although i have never used it. Also will it grow for a number of years or is it only an christmas plant for the winter?


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Michelle. L.
Zone: 5a
Date: 24-Nov-06 02:37 AM EST

Hi Karen, I wouldn't put it under grow lights because although it needs light, the tag on my amaryllis said it doesn't like direct sunlight.. grow lights are special lights to imitate the sun aren't they? So i think just your light in your room should be enough. As for keeping it for another year, yes you can although some people find it easier to just buy new ones every year. I will write to you what it says on the tag as well for saving it for another year...After flowering, water and fertilize regularly. When leaves start turning yellow, water only as needed until foliage dies. Maintain Amaryllis indoors, or bury pot in semi-shade outside when frost damage has passed. Dig up just before frost. Let dormant Amaryllis remain dry through summer. Cut off dry, yellowed foliage just above bulb. Repot every 2-3 years. This is what it says, also I guess the repotting advice is because I also have read they don't like to be repotted often. Hope this helps. They are beautiful to have, I have 3 this year. Good luck!!


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Heli
Zone: 3a
Date: 21-Feb-07 10:03 PM EST

Wrote in Feb asking for help, no answer yet. Does anyone have any suggestions? The Lupins are taking over everything (ie I had silver mounds, a blue sea oyster, ground cover pink phlox & bearded Irises that have all but disappeared. The delphinium is not doing well either.) This was the original message: Planting a perenial flower bed in clay with southern exposure (full sun). There is an underground stream flowing below this area and it is backed by White & Red Pines which add to the acidity. The clay will dry on the surface but is wet 2" to 3" down even in mid summer. Lupins, Rudbeckias (Black Eyed Susans), Daisys, Wild Roses, Golden Rod, Irises & Lilies all do really well in this area. I am looking for fairly tall (24" to 6 or 7 feet) perenials to add. Holly Hocks have not worked, haven't tried sunflowers. Delphinians just barely survive. Because there are lots of rocks & since the area is 30' deep and 200' wide, I need plants that require minimal care. Thanks for any suggestions.


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Maryann
Zone: 3
Date: 08-Mar-07 11:34 PM EST

H I'm new to the site and to gardening and have started a few different plants this year from seed instead of buying. The question that I have is do all plants need to be pinched to promote bushiness? I have started Gazania's. osteospermum,snap dragons,and asters. I started petunias and know that they need to be pinched but that's the only plants that I know for sure and would like some advice. Thank you.


Subject: trees
From: n.stites
Zone: 9
Date: 09-Apr-07 10:19 AM EST

Please, does anyone know how to strilize a full grown grapefruit tree? Rotting fruit everywhere (though it does attract woodpeckers).


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Maureen
Zone:
Date: 05-Jul-07 06:29 PM EST

I bought a new house in February, and there were NO plants,and being new to growing plants outdoors, i bought a few and planted them. ONE was a Hydrangia, and the other was a Rhodedendron. While i may be able to grow any plant INDOORS, OUTDOORS is presenting a PROBLEM!! My Hydrangia was growing JUST fine til two days ago, and i even saw some flower buds. NOW it looks like it's dying. As for the Rhodi, LOTS of leaves but NO flowers ( lime has NOT been within 2 feet of it). HELP!!! what am i doing wrong with these plants?? :(


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Maureen
Zone:
Date: 05-Jul-07 06:31 PM EST

And the reason WHY i didn't put a zone down is that i'm not SURE where Nfld fits into the zone map. zone5 perhaps?? REAL neophyte!! sheesh!


Subject: RE: new to gardening HELP needed
From: Rita
Zone: 5b
Date: 23-Jun-09 09:23 PM EST

Petunias - I'm such a novice that pinching my petunias makes me nervous. Where do I pinch them? Secondly, I'd really appreciate someone explaining how to root petunia cuttings. Remember . . . I am a novice novice gardener and need as much description as possible. Is there a video somewhere I can watch? that's how I learn best . . . by seeing someone else do it!

Thanks a lot in advance and Blessings, Rita


In order to post the forum, you must register to the site.
To register, click here.

If you have already registered, you must log in.
  • New Eden
  • Kids Garden
  • Plant a Row Grow a Row