General Discussion:

How do I train a climbing vine?


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Cynthia18-May-02 07:52 PM EST 5a   
peggy18-May-02 10:41 PM EST 3a   
peggy18-May-02 10:41 PM EST 3a   
Cynthia19-May-02 07:12 AM EST 5a   
Ed19-May-02 08:19 AM EST 5b   
Susan19-May-02 09:38 AM EST 6a   


Subject: How do I train a climbing vine? ETC.
From: Cynthia (twofinches@hotmail.com)
Zone: 5a
Date: 18-May-02 07:52 PM EST

Before you read this please keep in mind that I am a true green rookie but I am trying to learn all I can this year...So here goes...last year at the end of the season I bought a climbing plant of some kind (I do not remember what and the tag is long gone). For some reason I paid no attention to where it should be (shade or sun) because I did not know at that time that it was as important as it is...in any case I planted it in the corner of the fence where there is shade for a good part of the day. Consequently it is still only barely pushing out its little red buds while all around me the trees and bushes are in leaf . I feel awful because I think I may have put it in a bad location. I am finding it amusing that I really feel as if I should be apologizing to the dear struggling thing...I need to know what it is but if I take a peice of the pre-leafed plant into a garden center I doubt anyone could tell me what it is right? (or wrong?)Also I failed at getting it to attach to the fence (I only tried to wind its branches around and through the wooden slats but it keeps blowing down with the wind) If it is in the wrong location can I move it without damaging it? And how do you train a vine to attach to a fence? THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR HELP!


Subject: RE: How do I train a climbing vine?
From: peggy
Zone: 3a
Date: 18-May-02 10:41 PM EST

Don't feel bad Cynthia, we were all novices at one time & some of us still have some of those duh moments. Before you do anything radical with your orphan vine take a sample to a good reputable garden centre(a non busy time is best , they'll be able to give you more time) If they really want to keep you coming back as a customer they'll try to identify it for you. Once you've established it's identity then you can decide if it needs a new location. Moving shouldn't be too hard on your vine if you dig around it in such a way to get most of the roots. Use 10-52-10 fertilizer after transplanting & away you go. I think it's easier to start your vine on the fence with some other form of support other than just the boards. You could use a trellis (wooden or metal) or a large piece of plastic mesh like the kind they sell for sweet peas . Most garden centres sell it by the metre. Eventually your vine will spread onto the fence on it's own. Use something soft like old strips of j-cloth or other material to tie the vine onto your support system. Things like twist ties will damage the the shoots. Hope this helps a bit. Let us know what the mystery plant is-I'm curious!!


Subject: RE: How do I train a climbing vine?
From: peggy
Zone: 3a
Date: 18-May-02 10:41 PM EST

Don't feel bad Cynthia, we were all novices at one time & some of us still have some of those duh moments. Before you do anything radical with your orphan vine take a sample to a good reputable garden centre(a non busy time is best , they'll be able to give you more time) If they really want to keep you coming back as a customer they'll try to identify it for you. Once you've established it's identity then you can decide if it needs a new location. Moving shouldn't be too hard on your vine if you dig around it in such a way to get most of the roots. Use 10-52-10 fertilizer after transplanting & away you go. I think it's easier to start your vine on the fence with some other form of support other than just the boards. You could use a trellis (wooden or metal) or a large piece of plastic mesh like the kind they sell for sweet peas . Most garden centres sell it by the metre. Eventually your vine will spread onto the fence on it's own. Use something soft like old strips of j-cloth or other material to tie the vine onto your support system. Things like twist ties will damage the the shoots. Hope this helps a bit. Let us know what the mystery plant is-I'm curious!!


Subject: RE: How do I train a climbing vine?
From: Cynthia (twofinches@hotmail.com)
Zone: 5a
Date: 19-May-02 07:12 AM EST

Thank you so much Peggy! The first thing I am doing is going out this morning to remove the twist ties from a few tall flowers...the tag said that they would need to be staked so I took some old chopsticks and loosely twist- tied them to the sticks. I thought I was being clever but I see I may be damaging them. As for the vine, do you think I could take a twig of the branch even though it is not in leaf yet but only tiny red buds? Thank you for your reassuring note. I certainly will tell you what the dear little struggling vine is as soon as I have it identified.


Subject: RE: How do I train a climbing vine?
From: Ed
Zone: 5b
Date: 19-May-02 08:19 AM EST

For newly planted vines, or anything else to leaf out later than established plants is quite normal. The fine feeding roots require time to develope before the plant can receive nourishment and the energy to grow. To move or not to move ? As it may be perfectly OK as is, I would give it the benefit of doubt until otherwise determined. A season in a wrong location is not likely to result in damage to the plant. It can still be moved later, if found desirable.


Subject: RE: How do I train a climbing vine?
From: Susan
Zone: 6a
Date: 19-May-02 09:38 AM EST

To tie plants to supports, I use pantyhose! Take an old pair, cut cross-ways through the legs so you end up with a ring about 3/4 of an inch wide; cut it so it opens out into a straight piece; use it to tie the plant loosely to the support. The material has enough give that it doesn't damage the plants but still provides enough support to the plant. The color is unobtrusive and fades more over time to become almost invisable.


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