General Discussion:

How are you coping with the drought & heat


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Brian @ P&P Plants07-Aug-01 06:08 PM EST 3   
Ed07-Aug-01 07:04 PM EST 5   
Susan07-Aug-01 09:11 PM EST 6a   
Linda08-Aug-01 10:34 AM EST   
Ann08-Aug-01 06:54 PM EST 4b   
Brian @ P&P Plants08-Aug-01 09:35 PM EST 3   
Arne08-Aug-01 11:27 PM EST 8   
Betty09-Aug-01 09:30 AM EST 5a   
Ed10-Aug-01 07:28 PM EST 5   
Annie D11-Aug-01 09:49 PM EST 5b   
Ann13-Aug-01 07:23 PM EST 4b   


Subject: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Brian @ P&P Plants
Zone: 3
Date: 07-Aug-01 06:08 PM EST

I would like to know what others are doing to maintain their Flowerbeds & Gardens this summer. I have a 120 X 50 foot yard and also another 2+ acres. In my yard, I have both town water & stored rainwater to supplement the rainfall. in my Nusery, I have only stored rainwater, 8,000 gallon holding pond. Fortunately I have received 6.5 inches of rain since the first of May. This has helped keep the ground moist enough for most of the plants. This much rain also has kept my rain storage topped up. I have still about 6,000 gallons left. I grow mainly Native and Xeriscape plants that are hardy for Zone 3. These plants can handle the dryness & heat without much risk of dying. In comparison with other areas, 50 miles to the East, my plants are not suffering as much. Also I use mulching materials for my flowerbeds that keep the soil cool and moist. Let me know any other situations, hints and notes on handling this.


Subject: RE: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Ed
Zone: 5
Date: 07-Aug-01 07:04 PM EST

Those of us who survived the ice storm in '98 can probably take the heat, and its effect,with assuring optimism. At least we're working on it !


Subject: RE: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Susan
Zone: 6a
Date: 07-Aug-01 09:11 PM EST

Southern Ontario has been very dry this summer and is currently in the midst of a heat wave (mid 30s...) I put down soaker hoses in all my beds this year except for my 'wet corner'. They make watering so much easier and more efficient. I think my 'wet corner' must have a buried spring because, other than the first 1/2" or so, it's still very moist and hasn't needed any water although my neighbor's garden three feet away is bone dry and wilted badly...


Subject: RE: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Linda
Zone:
Date: 08-Aug-01 10:34 AM EST

Ed if you are growing native plants to the region; the should be able to survive what nature gives them. Bow Point Nursery is SpringBank never waters.


Subject: RE: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Ann
Zone: 4b
Date: 08-Aug-01 06:54 PM EST

I am on a well that in all the time we lived here has never gone dry, but I am conserving to be on the safe side. We have had little rain in a month and searing sun and temps. I have mulched everything I could and only water in the evening when the sun has gone down. I have let some flowers die...sad but they are annuals and I can replant next year. Need the water for veggies. Today noticed all the leaves fell off the 4 Carolina Poplar and Catalpa wilting badly.


Subject: RE: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Brian @ P&P Plants
Zone: 3
Date: 08-Aug-01 09:35 PM EST

I watched the News tonight & you people in Zones 4 & 5 are really getting the heat. In Alberta, we hardly made it to 20C today. Ont hte cool side for Corn & Tomatoes, good for cooler temperature plants. I suggest that if part of your heat stress on your plants is direct sunlight, erect a shade that will protect the plants from the direct mid day sun. This could be done with anything from a Golf Umbrella, Window screen, Cardboard stapled to slats, an old white bed sheet etc. Don't drape the shade material over the plant but suspend it so that it is in between the sun and the plants, allow enough distance so the air can circulate. Hopes this give some of you help in protecting your plants. If any of your plants are in containers, move them into the shade of a building, fence or shrubs during hte mid day.


Subject: RE: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Arne
Zone: 8
Date: 08-Aug-01 11:27 PM EST

Brian : here we are on town water as well but have a 250,000 gallon holding tank we use to water the open compounds and fields. We grow 285 varities of plants either from seed or from cuttings so when in cutting stage or liner stage it is town water we use. (greenhouses) Linda's comment to Ed about natives confused me as I thought it was you who were growing natives! We do those here as well and find that once they are established plants for cutting they are drought tolerant but in pots we have to water at least once a day. They would survive with no problem but as most growers know once they are stressed they stop growing and we do not reach our optimum heights or calipers if this happens. In our own garden beds we used good well rotted compost and top dressed with 2" of fish compost and it is amazing how much this holds the water in the soil. I also found using weeping hose under ground cloth with mulch on top really works well for water retention. I ahve gone as long as two weeks in hot summer temps between waterings.


Subject: RE: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Betty
Zone: 5a
Date: 09-Aug-01 09:30 AM EST

Not getting the high temperatures that Ontario is getting, mostly high 20's and low 30's but no rain except a couple of teasing showers for so long, going on 4 th week now I think. I water my containers and any new plantings daily, but for the rest of it, I check for wilted plants in the am,(figure that if still wilted in am , really need help) and only water those. I am on well water and have never known it to go dry, but find most plants seem to adapt if I do not water. My main beds have a good soil base(contains compost, rotted sod, and used potting soil) so seem to be be surviving fairly well. I have a couple of hedges of sunflowers that are looking rather tired but I do not plan to water them. This is the first summer I have been here every day, I was only here on the weekends before, so my plants before this year were used to going without water and I think that is helping them now. My problem is that I developed a lot of the garden out of an old rock pile, so anywhere that I got lazy, and did not clear all the rocks out, just added the soil on top, those beds are the ones that contain the wilted plants.


Subject: RE: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Ed
Zone: 5
Date: 10-Aug-01 07:28 PM EST

Lawns in E.Ont are toast brown and perennials are wilting, blooms a disaster or missing entirely on varieties that normally ar the pride of our August gardens. I was today ( 10th ) on a short drive through central Leeds Co. shocked to find many trees in marginal woodlots with brown leaves. I suspect that these were growing on shallow soil above bedrock, and are now dehydrated beyond recovery.


Subject: RE: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Annie D
Zone: 5b
Date: 11-Aug-01 09:49 PM EST

In my area (Brighton) we are in a severe drought/heat wave. The heat has lifted today but no sign of rain in the near future. This is the 8th week with no rain (we are not counting the 11 mm in July!) This is the driest year since 1946 so the papers say.My neighbours and I are all on wells and I passed along the dishpan suggestion I found on this site. That's all the water my plants have been getting and they are surviving but barely. I am amazed how much water we were letting go down the drain before I started using the dishpan.


Subject: RE: How are you coping with the drought & heat
From: Ann
Zone: 4b
Date: 13-Aug-01 07:23 PM EST

Just wondering if the trees that are losing their leaves now are just going dormant and will return healthy next year? I just heard that the long-range forecast for Ontario is warmer than normal September/October and no rain in sight. A disaster if they are right.


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